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What to cover with your Logo Designer

Updated: Jan 28, 2019



“Most designers take their work seriously, and as such can be very adamant about what they like and want and what they may think works best for you; yet, it is YOUR design and brand. If you can’t stand beside it with pride, it won’t matter how pleased the designer is with it."

I love logo design.


Very few aspects of a clients business have such a significant impact on the overall identity of the organization; But some things come up very consistently between clients and I; or in some case, should come up to make the relationship as effective as possible for both parties. The following are some of them:


Collaboration, Collaboration Collaboration

Your Logo is one of those things that should reflect your collaboration with the designer

wherever possible. The more decisive and clear you can be on what works and what does not, the better the branding will reflect your identity. Leaving it up to them is ok if you have a

preexisting relationship and trust them implicitly, but many times the process of design is

hindered by indecisiveness on the design between one or both parties, or not enough feedback between the two to bring it to completion. It is a delicate dance, but one that works best when the communication on the aspects of it is clear. I design with the intent of working long term on marketing with a client, so I attempt to establish as much collaboration as possible so that even if the relationship is not long term, the design is as well executed as possible.

Logo File Formats

One of the services I have been providing consistently as of late is “Logo Cleanup”. This is

usually digitizing a logo and providing file formats that are used consistently across various

levels of the client’s marketing. I have had to do this more lately because many to the clients

either no longer have or never received access to an already existing electronic logo

appropriate to the medium being marketing on or able to be manipulated (if needed)

I usually suggest a copy, of the vector based version (.ai in my case being an Adobe Illustrator user) .PNG, and .jpg. and to make sure that resolution is never less the quality needed. 300 DPI resolution (Print quality) for PDF and so that the display of your imagery will always display the quality you wish to convey for your business.


A designer SHOULD provide these as part of the rate you pay them, but it is good to “make

sure” your designer can provide these files and if, at an additional fee, what it is. (especially the vector one, if the relationship is a one-time project and not an ongoing relationship.

Allow the Designer to “Sell” their best designs but Remember your Role in the

Relationship

Most designers take their work seriously, and as such can be very adamant about what they like and want and what they may think works best for you; yet, it is YOUR design and brand. If you can’t stand beside it with pride, it won’t matter how pleased the designer is with it. This is their craft, so let the Designer explain the vision for the “one” they feel represents you best, but if you! still want, “the other one”… kindly and firmly stand on it unless you are flexible. It is YOUR logo and Your money paying for it. Choose what you love.


The details I have covered are not all inclusive, yet they deal with some very pertinent details to smooth out the relationship between client and Designer


For Your Consideration,

JCIII

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